Tue Mar 31 23:28:31 SGT 2015  
STD
DOCTOR
SINGAPORE™
    Urinary Tract Infection
STD DOCTOR SINGAPORE™
Within 3 days after unprotected sex, stop HIV infection with Post-Exposure Prophylaxis treatment
28 days after unprotected sex, accurately detect HIV infection with the 20 minute rapid test
Full & comprehensive sexually transmitted disease testing

Urinary Tract Infection | STD DOCTOR SINGAPORE™

Summary

Urinary Tract Infection | STD DOCTOR SINGAPORE™ @stddoctorsingapore_com: Urinary tract infection, Singapore. Private & confidential service.

Advertisement: Come to sunny Singapore to have your testing and treatment. Singapore Ministry of Health registered general practice (GP) clinic:
SHIM CLINIC
STD DOCTOR SINGAPORE™
168 Bedok South Avenue 3 #01-473
Singapore 460168
Tel: (+65) 6446 7446
Fax: (+65) 6449 7446
24hr Answering Tel: (+65) 6333 5550
Web: Urinary Tract Infection | STD DOCTOR SINGAPORE™
Opening Hours
Monday to Friday: 9 am to 3 pm, 7 pm to 11 pm
Saturday & Sunday: 7 pm to 11 pm
Public Holidays: Closed
Last registration: one hour before closing time.
Walk-in clinic. Appointments not required.
Bring NRIC, Work Pass or Passport for registration.

Description

Table of Contents

Urinary tract infection (UTI) and corresponding inflammatory conditions:
  • In men, it is rare. But when it happens in sexually active men, it is frequently caused by STD.
  • In women, it is frequently caused by Escherichia coli originating from the anus.
Urethritis is inflammation of the urethra. The most common symptom is dysuria (painful urination), followed by urethral discharge / genital discharge. For treatment purposes, it is classified in two categories: In the UK, Non-specific urethritis (NSU) may be used to mean that either gonorrhoea alone, or both gonorrhoea and chlamydia has been ruled out.

Cystitis is inflammation of the bladder.

Lower UTI symptoms are

UTI treatment is usually with antibiotics like trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole

Sexual risk (of HIV/STD/pregnancy), and what you can do before and after exposure.

Timeline HIV STD Pregnancy
Before exposure
Abstain from sex, Be faithful, or Condom use
Circumcision (males only)
Contraception (females only)
HIV PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) STD vaccine:
- Hepatitis vaccine
- HPV vaccine
STD / HIV exposure
Unsafe sex / unprotected sex:
No condom / Condom broke / Condom slip
0-72 hours HIV prevention
HIV PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) treatment
- Stop HIV infection after exposure.
STD testing.
If STD symptoms appear, then do STD treatment.
- Males: Do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving.
- Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating.
Emergency contraception (females only)
2 weeks HIV DNA PCR test
1 month 20 minute HIV rapid test - SD Bioline HIV Ag/Ab Combo:
- Fingerprick blood sampling.
3 months 20 minute HIV rapid test - OraQuick®:
- Oral saliva or
- Fingerprick blood sampling.
Full & comprehensive STD testing
- Males: Do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving.
- Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating.

References


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Susceptibility patterns of uropathogens identified in hospitalised children with community-acquired urinary tract infections in Thrace, Greece
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A 60-year-old woman who was wheelchair bound presented to the emergency department (ED) with right-hand cellulitis and a urinary tract infection. The patient’s medical history included multiple substance abuse, hepatitis C, a mitral valve replacement, and multiple strokes. She was nonverbal and fully dependent on caretakers. She was treated with IV ceftriaxone in the ED and sent home with a prescription for oral cephalexin. One week later, she returned to the ED critically ill with hypotension, altered mental status, and an erythematous rash on her upper extremities. (Source: AORN Journal)

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Accutane.xml Acne.xml Acyclovir.xml Alopecia.xml AndroGel.xml Asian+Journal+of+Andrology.xml Azithromycin.xml Benign-Prostatic-Hyperplasia.xml Botox.xml Candida.xml Cervical-Cancer-Vaccine.xml Cervical-Cancer.xml Chantix.xml Chemical-Peel.xml Chlamydia.xml Cialis.xml Circumcision.xml Clotrimazole.xml Cold-Sores.xml Contraception.xml Cryosurgery.xml Cryotherapy.xml Doxycycline.xml Erectile-Dysfunction.xml Fluconazole.xml Genital-Warts.xml Gonorrhoea.xml Hepatitis-B.xml Hepatitis-Vaccine.xml Hepatitis.xml Herpes.xml HIB-Vaccine.xml HIV-AIDS.xml HPV-Testing.xml Human-Papillomavirus-HPV.xml Impotence.xml index.html Infertility.xml Influenza-Vaccine.xml Influenza.xml International+Journal+of+Andrology.xml Ketoconazole.xml Levitra.xml Measles-Vaccine.xml Medroxyprogesterone.xml Meningitis-Vaccine.xml Metronidazole.xml MMR-Measles-Mumps-Rubella-Vaccine.xml Molluscum-Contagiosum.xml Mumps-Vaccine.xml NuvaRing.xml Obesity.xml Penicillin.xml Penile-Cancer.xml Peyronies-Disease.xml Pneomococcal-Vaccine.xml Polio-Vaccine.xml Premature-Ejaculation.xml Propecia.xml Prostate-Cancer.xml Relenza.xml Rotavirus-Vaccine.xml Rubella-Vaccine.xml Sexual-Dysfunction.xml Shingles-Herpes-Zoster-Vaccine.xml STDs.xml Swine-Flu-H1N1-Vaccine.xml Swine-Flu.xml Syphilis.xml Tamiflu.xml Testicular-Cancer.xml Testosterone-Injection.xml Tetanus-Vaccine.xml Trichomonas.xml Truvada.xml Tuberculosis-BCG-Vaccine.xml Typhoid-Vaccine.xml Urinary-Tract-Infections.xml Vaccines.xml Valtrex.xml Vasectomy.xml Viagra.xml Whooping-Cough-Pertussis-Vaccine.xml Yasmin.xml Yaz.xml Yellow-Fever-Vaccination.xml Zerbaxa is a newly approved combination antibiotic used concomitantly with metronidazole to treat adults with complicated intraabdominal infections and as monotherapy to treat complicated urinary tract infections. Zerbaxa is a combination of ceftolozane and tazobactam.